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Unterstand (Foxhole), plate 45 from the portfolio Der Krieg (The War)

Otto%20Dix%2C%20%3Cb%3E%3Ci%3E%20Unterstand%20%28Foxhole%29%2C%20plate%2045%20from%20the%20portfolio%20Der%20Krieg%20%28The%20War%29%3C%2Fi%3E%3C%2Fb%3E%2C%201924%2C%20etching%20and%20aquatint%20on%20paper%2C%20Museum%20Purchase%3A%20Helen%20Thurston%20Ayer%20Fund%2C%20%26%23169%3B%20artist%20or%20other%20rights%20holder%2C%2046.51
Otto Dix, Unterstand (Foxhole), plate 45 from the portfolio Der Krieg (The War), 1924, etching and aquatint on paper, Museum Purchase: Helen Thurston Ayer Fund, © artist or other rights holder, 46.51

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Details
Title

Unterstand (Foxhole), plate 45 from the portfolio Der Krieg (The War)

Artist

Otto Dix (German, 1891-1969)

Date

1924

Medium

etching and aquatint on paper

Edition

48/70

Dimensions (H x W x D)

plate: 7 1/2 in x 11 1/8 in; sheet: 13 5/16 in x 18 3/4 in

Inscriptions & Markings

numbered: 48/70, graphite, lower left

inscription: V, bottom middle

signature/maker's mark: DIX, graphite, lower right

inscription: Unterstand, lower right

Collection Area

Graphic Arts

Category

Prints

Object Type

intaglio print

Culture

German

Credit Line

Museum Purchase: Helen Thurston Ayer Fund

Accession Number

46.51

Copyright

© artist or other rights holder

Terms

aquatint

etching

intaglio printing

intaglio prints

playing cards

wars

World War I (1914-1918)

world wars

Description

Much of the Great War was fought from the trenches that soldiers dug, stretching from the English Channel to the Swiss border across the Western Front. An estimated four million soldiers were living, fighting, and dying in trenches by the summer of 1915. Conditions were often wretched, but soldiers attempted to create a few creature comforts in fortified bunkers.

The tightly packed composition of Dix's etching suggests the claustrophobic conditions of these underground hideouts. The pocked skin of the man on the left is perhaps a reference to the constant scourge of lice and fleas that shared the trenches with the soldiers.

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