X
MOV File
Online Collections

Longquan ware funerary vessel with five spouts and lotus design

China%2C%20Zhejiang%20province%2C%20Longquan%20kilns%2C%20%3Cb%3E%3Ci%3E%20Longquan%20ware%20funerary%20vessel%20with%20five%20spouts%20and%20lotus%20design%3C%2Fi%3E%3C%2Fb%3E%2C%2011th%20century%20%28jar%29%3B%2012th%20century%20%28lid%29%2C%20light%20gray%20stoneware%20with%20molded%20and%20carved%20design%20under%20celadon%20glaze%2C%20Museum%20Purchase%3A%20Ella%20M.%20Hirsch%20Fund%2C%20public%20domain%2C%2038.45
China, Zhejiang province, Longquan kilns, Longquan ware funerary vessel with five spouts and lotus design, 11th century (jar); 12th century (lid), light gray stoneware with molded and carved design under celadon glaze, Museum Purchase: Ella M. Hirsch Fund, public domain, 38.45

This work is on view.

Save to My Collection
Facebook Twitter
Details
Title

Longquan ware funerary vessel with five spouts and lotus design

Artist

China, Zhejiang province, Longquan kilns

Date

11th century (jar); 12th century (lid)

Period

China: Northern Song period (960-1127 CE)

China: Northern Song period (960-1127 CE)

Medium

light gray stoneware with molded and carved design under celadon glaze

Dimensions (H x W x D)

8 1/4 in x 3 1/4 in x 3 1/4 in diam.

Collection Area

Asian Art

Category

Ceramics

Object Type

jar

Culture

Chinese

Credit Line

Museum Purchase: Ella M. Hirsch Fund

Accession Number

38.45

Copyright

public domain

Terms

bird

celadon

ceramics

jars

Northern Song

stoneware

Place Made

Created in: Zhejiang

Location

Belluschi Building

Ayer Wing

1st Floor

Goodman Gallery

Description

Beginning in the late tenth century, the Longquan kilns in Zhejiang emerged as a dominant center for the production of high quality green-glazed stonewares. Longquan celadons range in color from teal to green to olive-brown, but all share a thin, dense, gray body and thick glaze, often applied in multiple layers. The glaze is slightly under-fired at a temperature of around 1200 ºC, which prevents it from fusing with the body. Air bubbles trapped in the glaze reflect light, giving the glaze a softly iridescent appearance. This lotus-shaped jar, with its five false “spouts,” is thought to have been used in funerary rituals.

Related Artworks
Media
IMLS logoNEA logoNEH logo

The Portland Art Museum’s Online Collections site is brought to you thanks to support provided by the State of Oregon through its second Culture, History, Arts, Movies, and Preservation funding program and generous awards from the Institute of Museum and Library Services, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the National Endowment for the Arts.