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Seated Portrait

Bea%20Nettles%2C%20%3Cb%3E%3Ci%3E%20Seated%20Portrait%3C%2Fi%3E%3C%2Fb%3E%2C%201970%2C%20photographs%20on%20linen%2C%20hand%20colored%20and%20machine%20stitched%2C%20housed%20in%20hinged%20wooden%20box%20with%20velvet%20covers%2C%20Gift%20of%20the%20Artist%2C%20%26%23169%3B%20Bea%20Nettles%2C%202011.74.1
Bea Nettles, Seated Portrait, 1970, photographs on linen, hand colored and machine stitched, housed in hinged wooden box with velvet covers, Gift of the Artist, © Bea Nettles, 2011.74.1

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Details
Title

Seated Portrait

Artist

Bea Nettles (American, born 1946)

Date

1970

Medium

photographs on linen, hand colored and machine stitched, housed in hinged wooden box with velvet covers

Dimensions (H x W x D)

each image: 10 1/16 in x 7 15/16 in

Collection Area

Photography

Category

Photographs

Object Type

photograph

Culture

American

Credit Line

Gift of the Artist

Accession Number

2011.74.1

Copyright

© Bea Nettles

Terms

boxes

linen

photographs

portraits

velvet

wood

Description

In 1970, the same year that Bea Nettles was denied access to her graduate school’s darkroom because of her unorthodox approach to photography, the artist’s double self-portrait was chosen for inclusion in the landmark Photography into Sculpture exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA). The young Nettles’s machine-stitched and toned, boxed images represented a new experimental thread that gained credibility during the late 1960s, as traditional concepts of the photographic image were challenged. No longer relegated to the gallery wall, photography moved to the pedestal and the floor, functioning as three-dimensional sculpture that explored and exploited new technologies. The double-portrait on display here is the only existing variant of the MoMA piece.

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