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After the Fire Architecture (1211 Southwest First Avenue at Madison)

Minor%20White%2C%20%3Cb%3E%3Ci%3E%20After%20the%20Fire%20Architecture%20%281211%20Southwest%20First%20Avenue%20at%20Madison%29%3C%2Fi%3E%3C%2Fb%3E%2C%20ca.%201939%2C%20gelatin%20silver%20print%2C%20Courtesy%20of%20the%20Fine%20Arts%20Collection%2C%20U.S.%20General%20Services%20Administration.%20New%20Deal%20Art%20Project%2C%20public%20domain%2C%20L42.2.4
Minor White, After the Fire Architecture (1211 Southwest First Avenue at Madison), ca. 1939, gelatin silver print, Courtesy of the Fine Arts Collection, U.S. General Services Administration. New Deal Art Project, public domain, L42.2.4

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Details
Title

After the Fire Architecture (1211 Southwest First Avenue at Madison)

Related Titles

inscribed: After the Fire Architecture

Artist

Minor White (American, 1908-1976)

Date

ca. 1939

Medium

gelatin silver print

Dimensions (H x W x D)

image: 10 5/16 in x 13 3/16 in; sheet: 10 5/16 in x 13 3/16 in

Inscriptions & Markings

title: After the Fire Architecture, graphite, bottom left

signature: Minor White, graphite, bottom right

Collection Area

Photography; Northwest Art

Category

Books, Portfolios, and Manuscripts

Photographs

Object Type

photograph

Culture

American

Credit Line

Courtesy of the Fine Arts Collection, U.S. General Services Administration. New Deal Art Project

Accession Number

L42.2.4

Copyright

public domain

Terms

gelatin silver prints

photographs

Picturing Oregon

storefronts

streetscapes

Works Progress Administration Artworks

Place Made

Created in and depicts: Portland

Created in and depicts: Oregon

Description

On August 2, 1873, a major fire that began at the Hurgren and Shindler Furniture Shop at Southwest First Avenue and Taylor Street consumed twenty-two blocks of downtown Portland in just twelve hours. This catastrophe, paired with a multi-block fire that occurred nearby just eight months earlier, changed firefighting procedures and construction methods in and around the city. Built in 1885, this two-story commercial brick building with iron-front decoration avoided extensive use of timber, reducing the potential for total loss in the event of another downtown fire.

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