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Huari


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Art & Architecture Thesaurus

Preferred Term

Huari

Details

Andean style and culture of the central and northern highlands of the Middle Horizon (ca. 600-1000 CE); named after an archaeological site located in the central highland region of present-day Peru. The style is related to that of monuments at the great site of Tiwanaku, located on Lake Titicaca in northwestern Bolivia. Huari was probably the centre of a militaristic empire that dominated much of the Peruvian highlands and coast during the earlier part of the Middle Horizon. Its influences are seen especially in the Late Nazca (Ica) culture of the southern coast and at Pachacamac on the central coast. The most distinctive decorative motif on Huari pottery is the Doorway God, a stylized, anthropomorphic figure often represented in front view with a rectangular face and rayed headdress. This motif is also found at Tiwanaku. Huari architecture features large enclosures constructed of stone masonry. Monumental temple sculpture is naturalistic and depicts both male and female figures with elaborate hairstyles.

Variations

Huanca

Wanka

Wanka Indians

Huanca Indians

Wari

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