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Pad Saddle

Cree%20artist%2C%20%3Cb%3E%3Ci%3E%20Pad%20Saddle%3C%2Fi%3E%3C%2Fb%3E%2C%20ca.%201890%2C%20leather%2C%20glass%20beads%2C%20and%20wool%20yarn%2C%20The%20Elizabeth%20Cole%20Butler%20Collection%2C%20no%20known%20copyright%20restrictions%2C%2091.95.21
Cree artist, Pad Saddle, ca. 1890, leather, glass beads, and wool yarn, The Elizabeth Cole Butler Collection, no known copyright restrictions, 91.95.21

Cree%20artist%2C%20%3Cb%3E%3Ci%3E%20Pad%20Saddle%3C%2Fi%3E%3C%2Fb%3E%2C%20ca.%201890%2C%20leather%2C%20glass%20beads%2C%20and%20wool%20yarn%2C%20The%20Elizabeth%20Cole%20Butler%20Collection%2C%20no%20known%20copyright%20restrictions%2C%2091.95.21

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Details
Title

Pad Saddle

Artist

Cree artist (Cree)

Date

ca. 1890

Medium

leather, glass beads, and wool yarn

Dimensions (H x W x D)

6 in x 8 3/4 in x 16 1/2 in

Collection Area

Native American Art

Category

Plains

Animal Equipment

Object Type

pad saddle

Cultural Group

Cree

Credit Line

The Elizabeth Cole Butler Collection

Accession Number

91.95.21

Copyright

no known copyright restrictions

Terms

beads

leather

pad saddles

Plains Cree

Plains Indian

saddles

The Elizabeth Cole Butler Collection

yarn

Description

By the mid-eighteenth century horses had spread throughout the Plains region. As Plains Indian peoples became expert horsemen, they began to create a variety of trappings for their horses. Derived from Spanish pack saddles, pad saddles were commonly made by peoples of the northern and northeastern Plains such as the Plains Cree. Pad saddles are usually rectangular or oval tanned leather tubes stuffed with grass or moose hair. A band of tanned leather sewn across the middle provides an attachment for the stirrups. Floral beaded decoration covers the corners, from which hang beaded panels that are often further embellished with yarn tassels.

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