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Hanayagi Shôtarô as Taki no Shiraito

%26%23332%3Bta%20Masamitsu%2C%20%3Cb%3E%3Ci%3E%20Hanayagi%20Sh%26%23244%3Btar%26%23244%3B%20as%20Taki%20no%20Shiraito%3C%2Fi%3E%3C%2Fb%3E%2C%201954%2C%20color%20woodblock%20print%2C%20Gift%20of%20Mrs.%20Fay%20Kramer%2C%20%26%23169%3B%20unknown%2C%20research%20required%2C%2091.48.1K
Ōta Masamitsu, Hanayagi Shôtarô as Taki no Shiraito, 1954, color woodblock print, Gift of Mrs. Fay Kramer, © unknown, research required, 91.48.1K

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Details
Title

Hanayagi Shôtarô as Taki no Shiraito

Related Titles

Series Title: Gendai butai geika (Flowers of the Modern Stage)

Artist

Ōta Masamitsu (Japanese, 1893-1975)

Date

1954

Medium

color woodblock print

Dimensions (H x W x D)

image: 14 3/4 in x 9 7/8 in; sheet: 16 5/8 in x 10 7/8 in

Collection Area

Asian Art; Graphic Arts

Category

Prints

Japanese Modern Prints

Object Type

relief print

Culture

Japanese

Credit Line

Gift of Mrs. Fay Kramer

Accession Number

91.48.1K

Copyright

© unknown, research required

Terms

Japanese woodblock prints

relief printing

relief prints

woodcut

Description

Hanayagi Shôtarô (1894-1965) was an actor who flourished in Tokyo in the 1920s through 1950s. He led the revival of the Shinpa (New Faction) school of theater, which combined elements of traditional kabuki with modern and Western drama. A handsome man, he won popular acclaim as an actor in female roles on stage, but in later life he played male lead roles as well. He appeared in Mizoguchi Ken's famous 1939 film, "Zangiku Monogatari" in 1939, and is the subject of _Yakusha shosetsu Hanayagi Shôtarô_, written by his friend, the author Kawaguchi Shôtarô. In 1952 he became the head of a Shinpa troupe, and appeared many times with the group’s female lead, Mizutani Yaeko. He was recognized by the Japanese government as a “Living National Treasure” for his artistic skills, and won numerous prizes. Hanayagi is depicted here as Taki no Shiraito (The Waterfall’s White Thread), an itinerant female entertainer in Izumi Kyôka’s play and film, ‘Giketsu kyôketsu.”

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