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Portrait of Annette Kaufman

Milton%20Avery%2C%20%3Cb%3E%3Ci%3E%20Portrait%20of%20Annette%20Kaufman%3C%2Fi%3E%3C%2Fb%3E%2C%201932%2C%20oil%20on%20board%2C%20Gift%20of%20Annette%20Kaufman%20in%20memory%20of%20Louis%20Kaufman%2C%20%26%23169%3B%20artist%20or%20other%20rights%20holder%2C%201998.1.1
Milton Avery, Portrait of Annette Kaufman, 1932, oil on board, Gift of Annette Kaufman in memory of Louis Kaufman, © artist or other rights holder, 1998.1.1

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Details
Title

Portrait of Annette Kaufman

Artist

Milton Avery (American, 1885-1965)

Date

1932

Medium

oil on board

Dimensions (H x W x D)

22 in x 16 in

Inscriptions & Markings

signature/maker's mark: Signed," Milton Avery" lower left

Collection Area

American Art

Category

Paintings

Object Type

painting

Culture

American

Credit Line

Gift of Annette Kaufman in memory of Louis Kaufman

Accession Number

1998.1.1

Copyright

© artist or other rights holder

Terms

oil paint

oil paintings

paintings

portraits

Location

Belluschi Building

Hirsch Wing

2nd Floor

Anne K. Millis Galleries

Millis Galleries (West)

Description

Avery, the son of a tanner, spent decades supporting himself at blue-collar jobs and receiving only modest art instruction. Through the late 1920s and 30s, he practiced drawing and painting at the Art Students League of New York. Portrait of Annette Kaufman and its pendant, Portrait of Louis Kaufman, are from this period.

Eventually, Avery attracted the support of financier and art patron Roy Neuberger (born 1903), who bought over 100 of his paintings and brought considerable attention to his work. Although clearly representational, Avery's work was seminal to American abstract painting. Because he focused on color relations rather than the conventional illusion of depth, he was often thought of as an American Matisse. His bold, creative and poetic use of drawing and color set him apart from more conventional painting of his era. In spite of his successes, however, Avery's work was not universally praised. Early in his career, it was often considered too radical because of its abstract qualities; when Abstract Expressionism became dominant, his work was frequently criticized or overlooked for being too representational.

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