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The History of Printmaking: S.W. Hayter Discovers Viscosity Printing

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Warrington Colescott, The History of Printmaking: S.W. Hayter Discovers Viscosity Printing, 1976, soft-ground etching and aquatint, with vibrograver, and relief rolls through stencils, printed in color on cream Arches paper, Museum Purchase: Caroline Ladd Pratt Fund, © Warrington Colescott, 80.47.1h

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Details
Title

The History of Printmaking: S.W. Hayter Discovers Viscosity Printing

Related Titles

series (original language): The History of Printmaking

Artist

Warrington Colescott (American, born 1921)

Related People

subject: Stanley William Hayter (English, 1901-1988)

Date

1976

Medium

soft-ground etching and aquatint, with vibrograver, and relief rolls through stencils, printed in color on cream Arches paper

Edition

57/75

Catalogue Raisonné

Chapin 221

Dimensions (H x W x D)

plate: 21 7/8 in x 27 5/8 in; sheet: 24 7/8 in x 35 5/8 in

Collection Area

Graphic Arts

Category

Prints

Object Type

intaglio print

Culture

American

Credit Line

Museum Purchase: Caroline Ladd Pratt Fund

Accession Number

80.47.1h

Copyright

© Warrington Colescott

Terms

etching

intaglio printing

intaglio prints

paper

studios

viscosity

Description

Warrington Colescott's younger brother, Robert Colescott (1925–2009), was also an artist. Both men employed satire, appropriation, and humor to make their artistic point, often surrounding the theme of the artist at work. In this etching, Warrington imagines the precise moment when S.W. Hayter and his colleagues discover viscosity printing, a complicated method of adding color to an intaglio plate based on the relative viscosity of the inks.

Robert's mordant painting, Beauty is in the Eye of the Beholder, also examines an artist in his studio; it can be found in the west stairwell leading to the Hoffman lobby of this building.

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