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Mother and Child

Kitagawa%20Fujimaro%2C%20%3Cb%3E%3Ci%3E%20Mother%20and%20Child%3C%2Fi%3E%3C%2Fb%3E%2C%201818%2C%20ink%20and%20color%20on%20silk%2C%20Museum%20Purchase%3A%20Funds%20provided%20by%20Mrs.%20Maybelle%20Clark%20MacDonald%2C%20public%20domain%2C%2069.51
Kitagawa Fujimaro, Mother and Child, 1818, ink and color on silk, Museum Purchase: Funds provided by Mrs. Maybelle Clark MacDonald, public domain, 69.51

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Details
Title

Mother and Child

Artist

Kitagawa Fujimaro (Japanese, 1790-1850)

Date

1818

Medium

ink and color on silk

Dimensions (H x W x D)

40 3/4 in x 13 5/8 in

Inscriptions & Markings

signature/maker's mark: Lower right two red seals, upper left black writing and three red seals

inscription: Dated inscription by the Confucian scholar, author, and calligrapher Nishijima Rankei. The greater part of the inscription consists of a four-line, seven-character poem in classical Chinese. The poem translates as follows: "The shining black of her moth eyebrows hints at the features of a mountain fairy, But her unbounded love for her child is yet more beautiful. The artist conjures forth the Goddess of Mt. Wu; The miracle of his skill leaves me amazed". The second half of the inscription tells when and where the poem was written, "Inscribed one day after the Chrysanthemum Festival in the Year of the Tiger (1818), under the south window of the Seikin Shooku Studio in the house of Miss Tami".

Collection Area

Asian Art

Category

Paintings

Object Type

painting

hanging scroll

Culture

Japanese

Credit Line

Museum Purchase: Funds provided by Mrs. Maybelle Clark MacDonald

Accession Number

69.51

Copyright

public domain

Terms

color

hanging scrolls

ink

paintings

silk

Location

Belluschi Building

Hirsch Wing

1st Floor

Schnitzer Family Gallery

Description

Fujimaro, about whom very little is otherwise known, was a pupil of the famous Japanese painter and print artist Kitagawa Utamaro (1753–1806). One of Utamaro's favorite subjects was young boys playing with their mothers, and Fujimaro shows his indebtedness to his master by taking the figure of the child in this painting almost directly from one of Utamaro's prints of the 1790s.

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