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Grapes

Qi%20Baishi%2C%20%3Cb%3E%3Ci%3E%20Grapes%3C%2Fi%3E%3C%2Fb%3E%2C%201945%2F1955%2C%20color%20woodblock%20print%20on%20paper%2C%20Gift%20of%20Donald%20and%20Mel%20Jenkins%2C%20%26%23169%3B%20unknown%2C%20research%20required%2C%2067.15.7
Qi Baishi, Grapes, 1945/1955, color woodblock print on paper, Gift of Donald and Mel Jenkins, © unknown, research required, 67.15.7

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Details
Title

Grapes

Artist

Qi Baishi (Chinese, 1864-1957)

Date

1945/1955

Medium

color woodblock print on paper

Dimensions (H x W x D)

image: 9 in x 12 in; sheet: 12 9/16 in x 17 in

Inscriptions & Markings

signature: Baishi huati jiuju 白石畵題舊句 (Baishi paints and composes old phrase), printed, right margin, center Language: Chinese

inscription: Wuguo liuhuan jinbuzai shijia jingu buxulun 吳國榴環今不在石家金谷不須論 (Liuhuan of Wu state does not exist anymore, it is no need to mention about Shi Chong's Golden valley garden.), printed, right margin Language: Chinese

seal: Qida 齊大, printed, right margin, bottom Language: Chinese

Collection Area

Asian Art; Graphic Arts

Category

Prints

Object Type

relief print

Culture

Chinese

Credit Line

Gift of Donald and Mel Jenkins

Accession Number

67.15.7

Copyright

© unknown, research required

Terms

fruit

paper

relief printing

relief prints

woodcut

Description

Fruits with many seeds are auspicious symbols of fecundity, and grapes are among them. Baishi often depicts grapes with a mouse or a squirrel, creatures associated with prosperity. In contrast to these positive associations, the inscription here mentions two ancient sites that flourished in the third century, but have long since fallen into ruin: "Liuhuan of the Wu Kingdom no longer exists, not to mention Shi Chong's Garden of the Golden Valley garden." The artist appears to be alluding to his own family home, which had suffered decay.

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