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The Entombment of Christ

Giovanni%20Francesco%20Caroto%2C%20%3Cb%3E%3Ci%3E%20The%20Entombment%20of%20Christ%3C%2Fi%3E%3C%2Fb%3E%2C%201510%2C%20oil%20paint%20on%20wood%2C%20Gift%20of%20the%20Samuel%20H.%20Kress%20Foundation%2C%20public%20domain%2C%2061.42
Giovanni Francesco Caroto, The Entombment of Christ, 1510, oil paint on wood, Gift of the Samuel H. Kress Foundation, public domain, 61.42

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Details
Title

The Entombment of Christ

Artist

Giovanni Francesco Caroto (Italian, ca. 1480-1555)

Date

1510

Period

High Renaissance (late 15th-1520s)

Medium

oil paint on wood

Dimensions (H x W x D)

11 3/4 in x 14 in

Collection Area

European Art

Category

Paintings

Object Type

painting

Culture

Italian

Credit Line

Gift of the Samuel H. Kress Foundation

Accession Number

61.42

Copyright

public domain

Terms

Christ

miraculous draught of fishes

mourners

oil paint

paintings

Saint Jerome

Saint Paul

Saint Veronica

Samuel H. Kress Foundation

veils

wood

Location

Belluschi Building

Ayer Wing

2nd Floor

Ronna and Eric Hoffman Gallery

Description

Renaissance painters, like their Gothic predecessors, were frequently called upon to depict complex religious narratives for churches or private chapels. While the Gothic painter designated separate areas for each incident, Renaissance artists, in an effort to unify their compositions, often combined several incidents within a single frame.

In The Entombment of Christ, Giovanni Francesco Caroto used spatial distance as a metaphor for separation in time by creating a broad, deep landscape that serves as a unifying element for disparate events. In the foreground is the burial of Jesus, attended by several mourners including St. Veronica, who holds the veil said to have been imprinted with Christ's image. The background scenes are from various earlier and later chronological points in Christian narrative: on the lake is the Miraculous Draught of Fishes; on the right, the Conversion of St. Paul; and kneeling on the hill is St. Jerome, who translated the Bible into Latin in the 4th century.

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