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Summer's Gone II

Lee%20Kelly%2C%20%3Cb%3E%3Ci%3E%20Summer%27s%20Gone%20II%3C%2Fi%3E%3C%2Fb%3E%2C%201960%2C%20welded%20bronze%2C%20Museum%20Purchase%3A%20Caroline%20Ladd%20Pratt%20Fund%20and%20the%20Jeannette%20Kelly%20Memorial%20Fund%2C%20%26%23169%3B%20Lee%20Kelly%2C%2061.24
Lee Kelly, Summer's Gone II, 1960, welded bronze, Museum Purchase: Caroline Ladd Pratt Fund and the Jeannette Kelly Memorial Fund, © Lee Kelly, 61.24

Lee%20Kelly%2C%20%3Cb%3E%3Ci%3E%20Summer%27s%20Gone%20II%3C%2Fi%3E%3C%2Fb%3E%2C%201960%2C%20welded%20bronze%2C%20Museum%20Purchase%3A%20Caroline%20Ladd%20Pratt%20Fund%20and%20the%20Jeannette%20Kelly%20Memorial%20Fund%2C%20%26%23169%3B%20Lee%20Kelly%2C%2061.24

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Details
Title

Summer's Gone II

Artist

Lee Kelly (American, born 1932)

Date

1960

Medium

welded bronze

Dimensions (H x W x D)

63 3/4 in x 23 in x 16 in

Inscriptions & Markings

date: 60, relief, on underside of lowest projecting limb, to right of signature

signature: K, relief, on underside of lowest projecting limb

signature/maker's mark/date:

Collection Area

Modern and Contemporary Art; Northwest Art

Category

Sculpture

Object Type

sculpture

Culture

American

Credit Line

Museum Purchase: Caroline Ladd Pratt Fund and the Jeannette Kelly Memorial Fund

Accession Number

61.24

Copyright

© Lee Kelly

Terms

bronze

bronzes

sculpture

Description

Lee Kelly came of age during the 1960s, at a time when abstract expressionism was being superseded by minimalism. As a student at the Museum Art School (now the Pacific Northwest College of Art), Kelly had worked with the painter Louis Bunce and also with sculptor Frederic Littman. From his earlier focus on painting, Kelly gradually moved toward sculpture, teaching himself welding. With its swelling, budding forms and soft patina, this early sculpture, Summer’s Gone II, shows Kelly’s debt to the teachings of Bunce and his interest in organic forms. He was later to abandon this more figurative style in favor of pieces (like the Museum’s Arlie [81.8]) that focus on simplified, geometric forms and the use of industrial materials such as Corten steel.

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