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The Drunken Cobbler

Jean-Baptiste%20Greuze%2C%20%3Cb%3E%3Ci%3E%20The%20Drunken%20Cobbler%3C%2Fi%3E%3C%2Fb%3E%2C%201776-1779%2C%20oil%20on%20canvas%2C%20Gift%20of%20Marion%20Bowles%20Hollis%2C%20public%20domain%2C%2059.1
Jean-Baptiste Greuze, The Drunken Cobbler, 1776-1779, oil on canvas, Gift of Marion Bowles Hollis, public domain, 59.1

Jean-Baptiste%20Greuze%2C%20%3Cb%3E%3Ci%3E%20The%20Drunken%20Cobbler%3C%2Fi%3E%3C%2Fb%3E%2C%201776-1779%2C%20oil%20on%20canvas%2C%20Gift%20of%20Marion%20Bowles%20Hollis%2C%20public%20domain%2C%2059.1

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Details
Title

The Drunken Cobbler

Artist

Jean-Baptiste Greuze (French, 1725-1805)

Date

1776-1779

Medium

oil on canvas

Dimensions (H x W x D)

29 5/8 in x 36 3/8 in

Collection Area

European Art

Category

Paintings

Object Type

painting

Culture

French

Credit Line

Gift of Marion Bowles Hollis

Accession Number

59.1

Copyright

public domain

Terms

canvas

children

Object Stories

oil paint

oil paintings

paintings

Location

Belluschi Building

Ayer Wing

2nd Floor

Mary and Pete Mark Gallery

Description

Intending to warn viewers about the evils of drunkenness, Greuze refers to the adage that the cobbler's children never have shoes. This work is a late manifestation of the highly theatrical, edifying subject matter introduced by Denis Diderot (1713–1784) in his moralizing plays known as drames bourgeoises. These theatrical pieces were written to counter the perceived licentiousness of the French aristocracy with domestic virtues and to appeal to the viewer's deepest emotional senses.

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